Community based Animal health and welfare: (8 pages)
Page 4: Participatory methods

ARTICLES

Methods on the move: a review of veterinary uses of participatory approaches and methods focussing on experiences in dryland Africa 1991.
Monitoring and impact assessment of community-based animal health projects in southern Sudan: towards participatory approaches and methods 1999.
Stakeholder workshops on animal health services, Jijiga, Degehabur, Fik And Shinile zones 1997.
Participation in the 80's and 90's: who asks the questions in livestock development? 1991.

Participatory Impact Assessment. A report on a series of introductory training courses for FARM Africa Ethiopia 2005.

Training course in participatory epidemiology, Ganyiel, Western Upper Nile, South Sudan 2005

Methods on the move: a review of veterinary uses of participatory approaches and methods focussing on experiences in dryland Africa. Participatory animal health services: a literature review. 1999
Andy Catley, PAVE Project, Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Livelihoods Programme, International Institute for Environment and Development, London. 100 pages. Catley, A. CAPE, OAU , 1999

This literature review describes the origins of participatory approaches and methods, and discusses their application in animal health services and research in less developed countries. The review focuses on dryland areas of Africa, in particular pastoral and agropastoral areas of the Greater Horn of Africa.
The article finds that:

  • in this area, most experience with veterinary uses of participatory approaches and methods resides with community-based animal health projects, some of which are involved in rinderpest control
  • this use of participation has proved to be effective relative to conventional approaches to service delivery
  • other institutions are beginning to use community participation and associated methods
  • support to developing improved field-level data collection methods has been very limited
  • epidemiologists tend to use formal survey methods rather than contextually sensitive or locally specific methodologies
  • participatory methods cannot necessarily be judged from a hard science paradigm
  • options for combining methods and systems of evaluation should also be investigated

full report in .pdf format (download time might be prolonged)

Monitoring and impact assessment of community-based animal health projects in southern Sudan.
Participatory approaches and methods: what role does it play in community-based animal health projects in southern Sudan? 1999

A Report for Vétérinaires Sans Frontières Belgium and Vétérinaires Sans Frontières Switzerland.
Catley, A. CAPE, OAU , 1999
This report describes the development of participatory monitoring and impact assessment systems in community-based animal health projects in southern Sudan. It also describes a process through which veterinary workers and other livestock staff reviewed their current monitoring system, were introduced to participatory approaches and methods, and then appraised some new ways of working in the field.
full report in .pdf format (download time might be prolonged)

Stakeholder workshops on animal health services, Jijiga, Degehabur, Fik And Shinile zones. 12th-15th August 1997. (summarised English version). Save the Children (UK)-Regional Bureau of Agriculture Veterinary Services Support Project, Somali National Regional State.
The need and possible modalities of establishment of community based delivery of veterinary services and inputs in the arid and semi arid areas in Kenya
Summarized report in .pdf format

Participation in the 80's and 90's: who asks the questions in livestock development? 1991
Leyland, T. CAPE, OAU , 1991
This dissertation has described the development and the nature of both farming systems research and rapid rural appraisal.
The article concludes that:

  • participation is a valuable concept
  • participation at the appraisal stage of projects is particularly important, because this is the time when the nature of the organisation of any development should be planned
  • there appears to be a drift away from diagnosis through quantification to diagnosis and planning through interaction of facilitators and farmers and the subsequent increased understanding
  • because of the great range of different livestock systems, it must be concluded that all the participatory rapid appraisal tools described are equally suitable for livestock projects
  • the facilitators of the tools ought to understand the concept of participation and that the facilitators are well versed in the problems they will encounter
  • this will require further education for many development workers and government officers, promoting such educating should be a priority in livestock development. The participation of people in local level planning will be the motivating force to stimulate such education

full report in .pdf format (download time might be prolonged)

Participatory Impact Assessment. A report on a series of introductory training courses for Farm Africa Ethiopia. Vetwork UK, Edinburgh 2005.

Catley A.

In September 2005 a series of three short training courses were organized to examine current monitoring and evaluation systems in FARM projects, and introduce participatory approaches to impact assessment. It was hoped that by the end of the training, project staff would be better able to design and plan participatory impact assessment (PIA) in their projects.

Full report

Training course in participatory epidemiology, Ganyiel, Western Upper Nile, South Sudan 2005

Catley A.

In order to develop the capacity of livestock agencies in South Sudan to use PE, a training course was organized by VSF CH for 15 staff from VSF CH, VSF B, VSF G and FAO. The course lasted 10 days, from 26th June to 5th July 2005, and took place in Ganyiel, Western Upper Nile. The objectives of the course were as follows:
At the end of the training the trainees will be able to:
1. The describe the origins and current uses of PE
2. Demonstrate the key attitudinal and behavioural aspects of PE
3. Use a range of PE methods correctly, and analyse and present the findings
4. Design research and/or surveillance work based on PE

Summary report